What Makes Steven Cerri Different?

First and foremost, Steven Cerri is an engineer and scientist mentoring and training other engineers in the interpersonal skills necessary for success. This is not a non-technical person telling technical people how to behave. Steven has been where the engineers and technical managers are “living”, and from this perspective, is uniquely qualified to teach the soft skills engineers do not receive in school.

Also, and in Steven’s words…”I don’t ‘just’ train. I don’t classify myself ‘a trainer’ although sometimes you will hear me refer to myself as a trainer merely out of convenience in communication with others.”

“Training is a process of transferring information. From a neuro-science perspective, training speaks to the intellect. We all know that speaking to the intellect transmits information but not necessarily a change in behavior. Just notice how many self-help books are printed every year, year after year after year after year. If information were sufficient to change behavior, then printing new books would be unnecessary.”

“Most engineers and engineering managers who are in need of change or want change or those who have managers who want change for them, speaking to the intellect is the ‘safe path’. It is comfortable. Technical people know how to ‘learn from information’. Their premise is, ‘If I can understand it I can do it’. That typical engineer’s mentality can lead to change in applying physical laws to engineering questions but it seldom leads to change on a human, interpersonal level… just look inside your organizations. Understanding is often insufficient to allow people to make the behavioral transitions necessary for a successful long-term technical career.”

Best course (Influencing Without Authority) I have attended in years. Tim Mueller, Manager, Lockheed Martin

“Instead, to change behavior, to give people new choices in their behavior, information, tools, and processes, information, insight, and motivation must be communicated to the ‘whole person’ and aligned with their internal sense of who they are. While the phrase ‘whole person’ may sound a little ambiguous, it means that in my programs I provide a means by which the participant’s whole neurology can receive the same message. Whether through visual, auditory, or kinesthetic presentations of content, all channels and forms of communication are melded together to give a seamless yet comprehensive ‘facilitation’ for change. And because this process is presented by an engineer, scientist, and businessman (i.e., me) to engineers, scientists, and business people, my facilitation programs have much more power, credibility, and impact than regular training programs.”

“I am a facilitator not just a trainer.”

“It was best said by a training manager attending one of my public workshops titled ‘Influencing Without Authority for Technical Professionals'”. (I’m paraphrasing slightly for brevity).
“Steven has a rare ability. Not many can do what Steven does. He has an agenda but because of his technical background can comfortably stray from it when he needs to. He can be presenting his material and a question from a member of the group will come up and he will run with it. Because he is an engineer he can adjust and make the material he was presenting specifically applicable to the question and the specific situation the participant is presenting and then, when he has completed that, move back to his original agenda. Meanwhile in that process, he helped that person specifically get what they needed, not a generality, and the rest of the participants took away something from that specific example that they can probably use as well. This is a rare gift.”